A History of the Philosophy of Law from the Ancient Greeks by Michael Gagarin, Paul Woodruff (auth.), Fred D. Miller Jr

By Michael Gagarin, Paul Woodruff (auth.), Fred D. Miller Jr (eds.)

A Treatise of criminal Philosophy and common Jurisprudence is the first-ever multivolume therapy of the total spectrum of matters in criminal philosophy and basic jurisprudence, from either a theoretical and a old standpoint. The paintings is geared toward jurists in addition to criminal and useful philosophers. This exhaustive paintings is gifted in wide sections: The Theoretical half (2005) includes five volumes and covers the most subject matters of up to date debate; The old half (2006-2007) comprises 6 volumes reviewing the improvement of criminal notion from old Greek occasions in the course of the 20th century.

The present e-book contains

Volume 6: A historical past of the Philosophy of legislation from the traditional Greeks to the Scholastics

Volume 7: The Jurists' Philosophy of legislation from Rome to the 17th Century

Volume eight: A heritage of the Philosophy of legislations within the universal legislation global, 1600-1900.

Edited by way of the popular theorist Enrico Pattaro and his staff, this can be a classical reference paintings of surpassing curiosity to criminal and useful philosophers, in addition to jurists and Philosophy of Law-scholars in any respect levels.

Show description

By Michael Gagarin, Paul Woodruff (auth.), Fred D. Miller Jr (eds.)

A Treatise of criminal Philosophy and common Jurisprudence is the first-ever multivolume therapy of the total spectrum of matters in criminal philosophy and basic jurisprudence, from either a theoretical and a old standpoint. The paintings is geared toward jurists in addition to criminal and useful philosophers. This exhaustive paintings is gifted in wide sections: The Theoretical half (2005) includes five volumes and covers the most subject matters of up to date debate; The old half (2006-2007) comprises 6 volumes reviewing the improvement of criminal notion from old Greek occasions in the course of the 20th century.

The present e-book contains

Volume 6: A historical past of the Philosophy of legislation from the traditional Greeks to the Scholastics

Volume 7: The Jurists' Philosophy of legislation from Rome to the 17th Century

Volume eight: A heritage of the Philosophy of legislations within the universal legislation global, 1600-1900.

Edited by way of the popular theorist Enrico Pattaro and his staff, this can be a classical reference paintings of surpassing curiosity to criminal and useful philosophers, in addition to jurists and Philosophy of Law-scholars in any respect levels.

Show description

Read Online or Download A History of the Philosophy of Law from the Ancient Greeks to the Scholastics: Vol. 6: A History of the Philosophy of Law from the Ancient Greeks to the Scholastics; Vol. 7: The Jurists’ Philosophy of Law from Rome to the Seventeenth Century; Vol 8: A His PDF

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Extra resources for A History of the Philosophy of Law from the Ancient Greeks to the Scholastics: Vol. 6: A History of the Philosophy of Law from the Ancient Greeks to the Scholastics; Vol. 7: The Jurists’ Philosophy of Law from Rome to the Seventeenth Century; Vol 8: A His

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In the period before Plato, three sources for law were under consideration: Law might be given by gods, invented by human lawgivers, or developed by nature. With each account of origins comes a slightly different concept of law. Ancient thinkers were concerned with the question whether law really is something that is ordained by god or nature, or whether it is something human beings invent. The legitimacy of law seems to depend on the outcome. Generally, ancient theories about the origin of law seem designed to serve as theories of moral foundation—or the lack of it.

After Solon, almost all important matters were referred to courts staffed by large numbers of ordinary citizens. Solon also opened up some types of cases to prosecution by any citizen who wished; previously, only victims could bring suits, but Solon realized that some victims would be unable to act for themselves and so he allowed others to act on their behalf. 19 In the fifth century further reforms, by Ephialtes who reduced the power of the Areopagus (ca. ) and by Pericles who first instituted pay for jurors (ca.

But you, Perses, should take this to heart: Listen to justice, and forget the use of violence altogether. CHAPTER 1 - EARLY GREEK LEGAL THOUGHT 21 This was the nomos that Zeus established for human beings: For fish and beasts and flying birds he allowed That one may eat another, since there is no justice among them; But to human beings he gave justice, which turns out to be Much better. (WD 271–80, as quoted in Gagarin and Woodruff 1995, 18–9) The consensus of scholars is that nomos “does not here bear the sense of ‘law’ or ‘ordinance’ which prescribes a certain behavior but designates the behavior itself,” and being god-given is “only incidental” (Ostwald 1969, 21).

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