Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (Yale by Susanna Braund, Glenn W. Most

By Susanna Braund, Glenn W. Most

Anger is located all around the old international, from the first actual note of the Iliad via all literary genres and each element of private and non-private lifestyles. but, it is just very lately that classicists, historians, and philosophers have started to review anger in antiquity. This quantity comprises major new reports by way of authors from diverse disciplines and nations at the literary, philosophical, clinical, and political points of historic anger.

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By Susanna Braund, Glenn W. Most

Anger is located all around the old international, from the first actual note of the Iliad via all literary genres and each element of private and non-private lifestyles. but, it is just very lately that classicists, historians, and philosophers have started to review anger in antiquity. This quantity comprises major new reports by way of authors from diverse disciplines and nations at the literary, philosophical, clinical, and political points of historic anger.

Show description

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Extra resources for Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (Yale Classical Studies XXXII)

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Hdt. 7 (m¯eniein: Frisk [1946] 35); other, later (incl. New Testament) examples in Frisk (1946) 33–4, 35–6. Ethics, ethology, terminology 33 That m¯enis has this particular character which associates it with the prodigious and awesome wrath of gods, heroes, and the dead does not warrant Muellner’s insistence that it is “a sanction meant to guarantee and maintain the integrity of the world-order” (1996: 26; cf. 32 “an irrevocable cosmic sanction”), upholding “cosmic prohibitions” (27–8) and “cosmic justice” (35), in fact “nothing less than the nomen sacrum for the ultimate sanction that enforces the world-defining prohibitions .

26 d . l. cairns not accidental; even though the folk physiology on which it is based is in many specific details different from our own, fundamentally, Homeric cholos labels the same concept as English anger. 241–2). 584–5); it also has painful symptoms and involves specific physiological changes. In one respect, however, the behavior of the term departs somewhat from the Aristotelian definition of org¯e, for while cholos is regularly a response to some kind of offense,68 it is not always straightforwardly the case.

80–3: note the “container” metaphors): A prince is stronger when he ch¯oesthai with an inferior man; for even if he digest his cholos at the time, he retains kotos in his breast in the future, until he brings it to fruition. Kotos is thus what remains when the occurrent emotion of anger becomes dispositional; like occurrent anger, it exhibits a strong desire for retaliation. 386 kotos is probably the dispositional basis for the immediate expression of anger in chalepainein. 177–8, shows that kotos and m¯enis can focus on the same offense (failure to honor a god in sacrifice).

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